04_reflection
Reflections, Student Contribution

I’m Not Really a Waitress’ – Creative Careers, Side Jobs and Professional Identity

Written by KX

‘I’m Not Really a Waitress’ is the name of a bright red nail polish from OPI. It’s a really evocative piece of marketing text, suggesting that the right visual cues can transcend a non-glamourous career. For an LA based company like OPI, it’s also a knowing reference to the reality of jobbing actresses, paying their way with other work. I’m not really a waitress. Not a waitress at all, in fact. I’m a PA. Or am I? I have the job to support myself in other creative work. If I’m at a party, I’d much rather tell someone about my performing. If I’m filling in a credit application, I’m very happy to say I’m a PA. So what am I really?

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04_reflection
Reflections, Student Contribution

Ernest Sternberg’s ‘Phantasmagoric Labour’ and the Creative Industries

Written by KX

Phantasmagoric. 1) Having a fantastic or deceptive appearance, as something in a dream or created by the imagination. 2) Having the appearance of an optical illusion, especially one produced by a magic lantern. 3) Changing or shifting, as a scene made up of many elements.- Dictionary.com

In 1983 Arlie Russel Hochschild published ‘The Managed Heart’, an exploration of the increasing demand for ‘emotional labour’ in service jobs. Ernest Sternberg builds on Hochschild’s work, but suggests that we, heavily influenced by celebrity culture, have entered into a new stage, he calls ‘phatasmagoric labour’. He also draws on Erving Goffman’s seminal work ‘The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life’ which used a dramaturgical framework to examine the way people ‘perform’ in social situations. Again, Sternberg moves beyond this: in place of dramaturgy, he examines human behaviour in a work context through the framework of iconography[1].

So what does that mean, and what practical implications does it have for those working in the Creative Industries?

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04_reflection
Reflections, Student Contribution

My Impressions

Written by Robbi Lindsay

Earlier this year, I received an email that was looking for students from Film, Media and Cultural Studies to participate in a five-week programme aimed at assisting participants in their job hunt in the creative industries and by extension “the job hunt” in general.

Despite not having any knowledge of employment opportunities available to graduates in the creative industries; any clear vision what I would like to do once I graduated; my perception that my age (I’m old like that) was a disqualifier and if not a disqualifier a hindrance; and never having worked in a creative industry, I was interested, very interested. I wanted a spot in the programme but spaces were limited.

I will never be sure if it was due to a lack of interest on the part of others but I was able to secure a spot. I was leery when I was told that I was just the type of person the programme was geared towards (perhaps they hadn’t quite yet clued in that I was old like that).

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04_reflection
Reflections, Student Contribution

Relentless

Written by Augustas Gadeikis

That was the message I read in between the lines of the speech of any professional freelancer working in creative industries. You’ll have to be relentless. And it was repeated by all the guest speakers during the module ‘Life with Creative Industries’ – once you go freelance, you’re your own boss, your own sales and marketing, your own PA and an assistant to all those above.

One of the module’s assignments was to conduct an interview with a professional freelance working in creative industries. I suggest that all students thinking of working in the creative industries do the same in the future. Ask them how they started. Why did they want to work in the creative industries? Was it as they expected? How did it change them and how have the creative industries changed since they started? What was the hardest part? All this will give you a good insight into what you might expect and maybe provide you with ideas on how to prepare for work in this sector.

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04_reflection
Reflections, Student Contribution

You Make Your Own Luck

Written by Éimear Doherty

‘Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity’ Seneca.

So, be ready.

When building your career, it goes without saying that you need to know your chosen field inside out. When building your career, one of the mostimportant things you need to know is who to speak to. The University of Arts London website offer some clear and helpful advice regarding networkingpitching and social media, which I cannot recommend enough.

This article aims to elaborate on their first ‘networking pointer’, preparation.

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Documentation

Different Sides of the Story

Let’s face it, ideas of how to find work, what work is and what working entails have changed tremendously in the past 10-20 years (if not way before that!). One thing for sure, it was clear from the start of the module that it was not enough to rely on the experiences of my colleagues and I on how to prepare students for work in the CCI when most, if not all, of our work experiences were limited to work within academia. It was decided that the best way to present a wide-ranging view of work today as well as what work entails in CCI today would require talking and meeting with people who work in these sector or who spend most of their time thinking about how best to prepare students for work. Thus a small group of industry professionals who work in the CCI in various capacities were brought together for this project.

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01_documentation
Documentation

Introduction to Work Matters in CCI

Welcome to the Work Matters in CCI website! This website is the culmination of a Higher Education Academy funded project titled Nice Work if You Can Get it! Preparing Students for Work in the Film, Media and Cultural Studies. The project sought to work out if it was possible to provide students, undertaking courses at the Department of Film, Media and Cultural Studies at Birkbeck, University of London, with the skills and knowledge to navigate the area of work in the cultural and creative industries (CCI).

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